Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Great Misheard Song Lyrics

I enjoyed another rip-roaring rock'n'roll show from Ziyo last Friday (and, eventually, I managed to find some friends to accompany me: Tennessee Tom and Animator Ben).

One of their catchiest numbers has this very rousing chorus: "Oh, let's burn it down! Oh, let's burn it down!"

Except that....... it does sound uncomfortably like: "All that spunk down...."


Such, I abashedly confess, are the depths of lewdness that the hyper-sexy frontwoman, Helen Feng, inspires in us.


I'm sure my readers have experienced many similar examples of mis-hearing lyrics. This could become another of my great 'audience participation' threads....

8 comments:

The British Cowboy said...

http://www.kissthisguy.com/

Try that for starters...

The British Cowboy said...

I also remember a Lenny Henry routine about how he grew up thinking Desmond Dekker was singing "My Hair is Alight."

Froog said...

There was a TV ad (back in the 80s, I think) where a Rasta was grooving down 'Israelites', but confused by the lyrics. He was holding up caption cards (like in that classic Bob Dylan video) with what he thought he heard. "My ears are alight."

I think "Sardines for breakfast" might have been in there too.

It was an ad for a brand of cassette tape - Memorex, maybe?

Froog said...

Sting's elocution is not always all that it might be. The early Police song, 'So Lonely' sounded as if it was in fact dedicated to an attractive BBC presenter of that era, Sue Lawley: Sue Lawley! Sue Lawley! Sue Lawley! Sue Lawley!"

omg said...

My brother loves to tease me about my childhood confusion over the song "Coconut" by Harry Nilsson. It didn't make sense to me. I didn't understand why or how the guy was supposed to put the lion in the coffee.

My husband is really bad with song lyrics, but I've probably picked on him enough this week...

Swordsman said...

Me old housemate Bryan swore that the line in "A Hard Days Night" to the effect of "That's why I love to come home" was actually "That's why I'm Lurcher Malone."

Odd, yes, but he did name his steam-driven old ghettoblaster Lurcher Malone as a result.

My favorite is Dexy's Jackie Wilson Said, where the line is, I am certain, "I'm an elephant."

Then there's always that country song You Picked A Fine Time to Leave Me Lucille (if that is the title), with the next line being undubitably "With two hundred children and crap in the field."

Froog said...

Those are a couple of doozies, Swordsman.

I recounted recently on Froogville that on one of my listening practice tape recording gigs I had had to read the lyrics of Louis Armstrong's 'What A Wonderful World' (transcribed by a junior Chinese editor at an educational publishing house), and found that there was a line, "The dogs say goodnight."

Froog said...

I think 'Lucille' is a C & W song. We should therefore await the wisdom of the British Cowboy to assist us on the questions of what the song is really called and what that lyric really is.